According to a quote attributed to the management guru Peter Drucker, “Culture eats strategy for breakfast every day.” While many senior leaders embrace the notion that culture is mission critical, the achievement of fully human work environments is rarely actualized. According to a 2018 global survey conducted by the Katzenbach Center, while almost two-thirds of C-Suite executives and corporate board members thought they had strong cultures, only 41 percent of the employees agreed. And, more importantly, regardless of how they assessed current culture, 80 percent of all survey respondents said their organization’s culture needed to evolve for their company to…


Over the past few years, there have been concerns about the management of content on social media sites, with some arguing there is too much misinformation that doesn’t belong in the public square and others who protest that there is partisan censorship of legitimate commentary. Until recently, these concerns have been mostly limited to political content. Although the quarrelling parties may find the behavior of tech companies bothersome, there is ample opportunity in our day-to-day discourse for the dissemination of various perspectives to correct for the concerns about political misinformation and political censorship. …


Part IV: The More Serious Public Health Crisis

When we eventually return to normalcy, we are likely to come out of this pandemic with a firm resolve that this must never happen again. Hopefully, the sense of urgency that will spring from this resolve will open our eyes to the far more serious public health crisis that has been hidden in plain sight: a digitally primitive healthcare system.

One of the most disturbing facts about dealing with pandemics is that there has been little innovation in battling invisible enemies. In speaking about the SARS epidemic of 2003, Dr. Anne Schuchat…


Part III: It Takes a Network

In almost every war, there is a moment where reality suddenly and radically changes, where the world on the day after the moment is completely different from the world before that moment. This happened with World War II on the morning of December 7, 1941 with the air strikes on Pearl Harbor and on September 11, 2001 with the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon. Such a moment happened again on March 11, 2020 when the NBA suspended its games indefinitely after Rudy Gobert of the Utah Jazz tested positive…


Part II: The Hazards of Experts

How is it that highly intelligent people can make senseless decisions? This was the question that sparked the groundbreaking work by Daniel Kahneman and Amos Tversky in understanding the psychological dynamics of human decision-making. These dynamics include two radically different thinking modes: the intuitive System 1, which is fast thinking that is both highly confident and prone to error, and the rational System 2, which is slow thinking that, while more grounded in probability, uncertainty and doubt, is likely to inform better decisions.

Kahneman and Tversky found that, while most people generally perceive themselves…


Part I: Following a Narrative

In his best-selling book Moneyball, Michael Lewis tells the true story of how the Oakland A’s general manager Billy Beane built a competitive team on a very limited budget by defying the conventional wisdom of baseball experts. Instead, Beane relied upon an unconventional sophisticated data analytics approach to scout and evaluate players. Despite perennial meager budgets, in the nineteen years Beane has used data analytics to build teams, the A’s have made the playoffs an impressive nine times. …


Image by Gerd Altmann from Pixabay

The pioneers who started the digital revolution were hackers. These free-spirited computer programmers should not be confused with the narcissistic fraudsters behind the myriad of present-day security breaches that prey upon honest hard-working people. While today the mainstream usage of “hacker” refers to the subversives who commit computer crimes, the original meaning of the term refers to computer enthusiasts who are part of a creative subculture intent on using developments in digital technology to build a better and more collaborative world.

These creatives are the revolutionaries who challenge the established order. They have a distinct distaste for the centralized top-down…


It was only fifteen years ago, in 2006, that the world was discovering the incredible potential of the rapidly emerging and unprecedented phenomenon known as mass collaboration. The burgeoning digital revolution spawned by the simple act of connecting the world’s computers was creating new and revolutionary ways for people to collaborate and work together. Scores of books were describing how what was then known as the World Wide Web was flattening the world and transforming the planet into a global community. Perhaps the most notable was Wikinomics, by Don Tapscott and Anthony D. Williams, who in their subtitle enthusiastically proclaimed…

Rod Collins

Futurist, keynote speaker, and host of the Thinking Differently podcast on the C-Suite Radio Network

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